LET’S ALL DRAW… Dinosaur Unicorns!

Younger kids, or people of any age who just don’t feel very confident in their drawing abilities, can often really respond to having a nice clear, simple step-by-step Here’s How To Draw A Thing guide to follow along to. So with that in mind: here is one! Let’s all have a go at drawing some Dinosaur Unicorns!

We might do some more of these? If anyone has any requests for anything specific they’d like to learn how to draw, just let us know – leave a comment here, or give us a shout on twitter!

Comic Club Spotlight with Inkpots

Hannah Sackett caught up with Gill Pawley of Inkpots to find out about the Inkpots comic club.

Name of your Comic Club: Inkpots Comic Crew.

Annamalai 1
Inkpots by Annamalai

Where do you meet and how often? We meet on Wednesdays at one of our after school clubs.

Average number of members: 10

How long have you been running? For about nine months.

Annabel and Martha
Fidget Spinners Take Over by Annabel and Martha

Tell us about your club:

We started the club after discovering Comics Club Blog and realising how many children just loved comics and drawing cartoons. It started at one after school club but has now spread to other groups

heath
comic by Heath

 

Do you have a comic club activity you’d like to share: There is always lots of interest in anything to do with chocolate…

annamalai 3
The Chocolate Problems by annamalai
annamalai 2
Mars Bar by Annamalai

Which comics should we be reading right now? The Phoenix is a big favourite!

What are your plans for the coming year?

We plan to have a big get together of all the Inkpots children who like comics and have a giant comics jam. We also hope to have one of the contributors from The Phoenix come and run a workshop for us.

Inkpots writing workshops

Many thanks to Gill for talking to us and to comic crew members for sharing their cartoons! We’re looking forward to them reporting back on their giant comics jam!

 

October Comics Challenge: CREEPY COMICS!

Halloween

This month we’ve got a special SPOOOOKY Comics Challenge for you, courtesy of the amazing Louie Stowell and Freya Harrison, who are here to give you some tips on FACING YOUR FEARS and BUILDING TENSION to make blood-curdlingly, spine-chillingly CREEPY COMICS!

A4_Halloween Activity Sheet (3)

 

Download as a PDF!

That’s just one of the fun activities in Louie and Freya’s new book / activity pad Make Your Own Comics, out now from Usborne!

Make Your Own Comics

Here’s some more info:

This awesome activity pad is jam-packed with everything children need to design their very own comic strips. Create comics about swashbuckling pirates, a space adventure, a rogue robot rampage and many more. With lots of hints and tips on drawing characters, showing emotions, setting the scene and adding speech bubbles and sound effects.

Available now from all good workshops, and also Amazon!

We had a a great time using this activity with Neill’s Comic Club group at the Story Museum. First we created Creepy Creatures based on our own greatest fears – here are some of the results!

Have a go yourselves, we’d love to see what you come up with! IF… WE DARE.

BONUS ACTIVITY! If you need some help getting started drawing monsters, here are some Halloween-themed activity sheets from Neill’s How To Make Awesome Comics, courtesy of The Phoenix!

Art Monkey 21a - VAMPIRE Activity SheetArt Monkey 21b - WEREWOLF Activity SheetArt Monkey 21c - ZOMBIE Activity SheetArt Monkey 21d - MUMMY Activity Sheet

Download all 4 designs as a PDF!

Happy Halloween, everyone!

c_c_logo_v3

 

September Comics Challenge: Collage Comics!

Drawing is just one way of making comics. Why not have a go at using collage to make a comic? Collect scraps of coloured paper, left-over packaging and wrapping paper, pictures from old magazines or newspapers, and get cutting and sticking.

With Autumn here, you could also use fallen leaves and seeds to create your characters.

Use the sheets below, or design your own collage comic!

Collage Comics 01

 

Collage Comics 02

 

 

 

Comic Clubs Spotlight with Kingsholm Primary School

Matt Bunce tells Hannah Sackett all about the Awesome Comic Club at Kingsholm Church of England Primary School, in Gloucester.

20170410_131918.jpg

Your Comic Club is run as part of the ‘Kingsholm University’ –  a university teaching comics sounds like a lot of fun – how does it work? 

The university works like this:

  • Teachers/teaching assistants/outside experts decide on a ‘module’ that they would like to run for 6 sessions.  Each session lasts approximately an hour and a half.  The modules can be about anything, and have ranged from sports, to art, to cooking, cleaning and decorating, to gardening and crafting skills, even hairdressing at one time.
  • The module leader plans a 6 week unit of learning covering the skills that will be taught to the children, and the end result.
  • The modules are then presented to the children in a (very long, exciting) assembly.
  • We then have the 6 weeks of university, on a Friday afternoon, from 12:30.
  • At the end of the 6 weeks, we have a celebration assembly where the children share some of their learning, and see a power point slideshow of all the units.  They receive a certificate to show they have completed their chosen module.
  • Then we do it again next term!

IMG_1519

Why do you run the Kingsholm University in your school?

One of the benefits of the university it that it enables children to share and develop skills that may not come through in a traditional curriculum.  Some of our children are very practical, and are able to use these skills in university modules.  Some modules (such as ‘Go, team. Go!’ and ‘Going Wild’) have focussed on team and leadership skills, and have allowed children who may not normally display those skills in a class setting, to take a more active role in a team/leadership situation given the practical nature of the tasks.  Finally, it allows children to develop new skills, and perhaps discover something they will love doing, and find their path in life.

IMG_1535[1]

Why did you choose to run a comic club module?

So, comics!  I love comics, always have, always will!  I have drawn a few in my life, and feel that they are underused in education.  However, I recognise that they are not readily understood by all teachers, and therefore perhaps shied away from during literacy sessions (apart from the ‘storyboard’ style comics used in story planning etc).  I wanted to communicate this love to the children, and also slyly get in some English learning in the 6 weeks I had.  It has been a very popular module with 25 children involved.

IMG_1542

What did your Awesome Comics sessions involve?

We covered character development, basic storytelling and dialogue in a visit from Neill Cameron, and then went on to look at drawing different poses, drawing faces and lettering.  The final two weeks were spent on drawing and expanding the basic strips and finally publishing the comic.  In addition, I hope to encourage the children to get into reading and making comics, as I know that comics can have a huge benefit to literacy skills – they certainly helped teach me to read!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Will you run this group again?

As a module, it is one I have enjoyed planning and delivering, I will certainly run it again next year.  I will also be running a comic club as an afterschool club next academic year.

Huge thanks to Matt for telling us about his club and for inviting Neill and Hannah to visit his group – which was full of awesome cartoonists! Their finished comic looks amazing – and was one of the comics to be featured over on the Comic Swap website.

 

August Comics Challenge: Drawing Emotions!

Our Comics challenge this month comes from special Guest Contributor Karen Rubins! Karen is an award-winning cartoonist and a contributor to The Phoenix, and also regularly teaches cartooning and manga workshops for children and young people.

Karen’s Comics Challenge is based around EMOTION, and it’s pretty self-explanatory. Here we go…

Karen Comics Challenge 1 - Emotions

If you’re working with a group, it can be fun to get the kids to shout out as many ideas as they can for different emotions, and then try drawing them. You can get kids to act out the emotions – take turns pulling faces for their neighbours to draw!

The next step is to have a go at drawing a comic, using some of these emotions! And if you need some ideas to get started, here’s a Bonus Extra Activity from Kaz, that you can use as a starting point:

Karen Comics Challenge 2 - Interview

Just pick a SUPERLATIVE and a NOUN, and away you go!

Huge thanks to Kaz for letting us share these. We’d love to see whatever drawings and comics your groups come up with – you can leave comments here, or tweet us at @ComicsClubBLOG.

You can find out more about Karen’s work at her website, at karenrubins.com, and find out more about her upcoming classes and workshops here:  http://karenrubins.com/workshops/

 

c_c_logo_v3

 

July Comics Challenge: Make Your Own Superhero!

2017-07-08 10.29.37

Superheroes are fun, right? Everyone loves superheroes? Well they are the focus of this month’s COMICS CHALLENGE, where we’re all going to be having a go at making our own. That’s the challenge, nice and simple: Make Up A New Superhero. And here are some handy Templates We Prepared Earlier, to help you do just that!

SuperHero Challenge 1SuperHero Challenge 2

Download the templates as a PDF!

Here’s a suggested ‘lesson plan’ / way to use these templates as the basis of a session with your group! This is based on the assumption that you have a whiteboard / flipchart / other flat and writeable-on surface to hand…

  • Start by thinking about Famous Superheroes. How many Superheroes can the group name? Try writing all the answers up on the board as you go. Bonus Discussion Points: Who is the coolest? Who would win in a fight?
  • Pick a couple of the suggested characters and see how much the group know about them. What is their secret identity? What superpowers do they have? Do they have any weaknesses? Who is their best friend? Who is their arch-nemesis?
  • Using the suggested characters as a basis, make a list on the board of superhero THEMES (e.g. Bats, Spiders, Cats – lots of animal-themed ones) and SUPERPOWERS (e.g. flight, super strength, stretchiness – see how many you can think of).
  • Get the group to come up with ideas for either the THEME or SUPERPOWER for a new hero. Try and get as many suggestions as possible on the board.
  • Pick one and have a go at creating a new Superhero!  Have a go at drawing them on the board! Don’t worry if you think you’re not good at drawing, try and give it a go anyway. If it really *is* rubbish, it just works as an encouragement to the kids to try and do better!
  • Okay, now everyone have a go! Confident artists can just dive straight in and start drawing; younger or less confident artists might want to use one of the worksheets provided above; just start designing a costume straight onto the template!
  • Once everyone’s had long enough to draw, take a look at everyone’s new heroes. Get each artist to tell you about their character!
  • FINAL STEP: everyone draw a comic about their superhero! You can use some of our handy comics page templates, to help you get started!

 

 

We’d love to see some of the results! You can tweet pictures at us at @ComicsClubBLOG, and we’d love to feature them here on the blog!

 

c_c_logo_v3